Alwood Family

John C. Freemont Alwood

John C. Freemont AlwoodAge: 72 years18631936

Name
John C. Freemont Alwood
Birth September 24, 1863 36 32
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Birth of a sisterAlice Elsie “Elli” Alwood
1866 (Age 2 years)
Death of a sisterMary Ann Alwood
May 9, 1870 (Age 6 years)
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Birth of a sisterNellie Grace Alwood
1871 (Age 7 years)

Death of a paternal grandfatherEphariam Kelly Alwood
February 26, 1883 (Age 19 years)
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MarriageVirginia Kate “Jennie” WaltersView this family
November 1, 1885 (Age 22 years)
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Birth of a son
#1
David William “Will” Alwood
August 25, 1886 (Age 22 years)
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Birth of a daughter
#2
Jennie Elizabeth Alwood
April 1, 1888 (Age 24 years)
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Birth of a son
#3
Harry Carl Alwood
August 4, 1890 (Age 26 years)
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Birth of a son
#4
Archie Rufus Alwood
May 13, 1894 (Age 30 years)
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Death of a paternal grandmotherElizabeth “Betsy” Salsbury
February 2, 1897 (Age 33 years)

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Birth of a son
#5
Fritz Albert Alwood
March 13, 1897 (Age 33 years)
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Death of a fatherLevi Salsberry Alwood
1897 (Age 33 years)

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Birth of a son
#6
Arthur Lee Alwood
February 18, 1902 (Age 38 years)
Birth of a daughter
#7
Nellie Ruth Alwood
March 25, 1905 (Age 41 years)
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Marriage of a childSam Jones PearceJennie Elizabeth AlwoodView this family
September 16, 1905 (Age 41 years)

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Birth of a son
#8
Homer Grant Alwood
January 17, 1908 (Age 44 years)
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Marriage of a childDavid William “Will” AlwoodLerah HammockView this family
March 10, 1915 (Age 51 years)

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Death of a motherDelila McQuillin
March 25, 1916 (Age 52 years)

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Death of a daughterNellie Ruth Alwood
May 2, 1916 (Age 52 years)

Cause: Typhoid
Marriage of a childArchie Rufus AlwoodKittie Gaynell AlwoodView this family
April 14, 1918 (Age 54 years)

Marriage of a childFritz Albert AlwoodLola May WoodcockView this family
May 9, 1918 (Age 54 years)

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Death of a brotherDavid Edward Alwood
1935 (Age 71 years)

Death May 23, 1936 (Age 72 years)

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Burial
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Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: July 29, 1849Lucas Co., Ohio
14 years
himself
-12 years
elder brother
11 years
elder brother
-2 years
elder sister
14 years
younger sister
-4 years
younger sister
-13 years
elder sister
Family with Virginia Kate “Jennie” Walters - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: November 1, 1885Goose Pond, Coffee Co., Tennessee
10 months
son
19 months
daughter
2 years
son
4 years
son
3 years
son
5 years
son
3 years
daughter
3 years
son

BirthTAK 12/90
MarriageTAK 12/90
DeathTAK 12/90
BurialTAK 12/90
Shared note

From The Family Alwood by Terry Klaus, June 1991:

JOHN C. FREEMONT ALWOOD sometimes known as 'Monty' was born in Cass City.Michigan on September 24, 1863. As a young child his family would move toCoffee County Tennessee. As a young man of 22 years, he took the hintfrom a friend to go over to the neighboring farm and check out the cuteyoung girl. Things haven't changed in all these years, he did just that,and it was a 15 year old Virginia Kate Walters who caught his fancy andshe would in fact say "I do" on November 1, 1885, in Goose Pond. GoosePond no longer exists, but the marriage lasted for fifty-one years."Jennie" as she was always known. came from Pennsylvania, born August 9,1869. Together Monty and Jennie raised eight children. For the most partof their early years they were living in the area of Manchester,Tennessee. In family stories, recalled by their youngest son, Homer, thetimes in Tennessee were hard on everyone, in fact the Indians even cameto the house asking for food. The Goose Pond and Manchester areas werenot highly populated, but some of the mountain people had been there formany years. When Will, the older brother of Monty, built a lumber mill inthe Deep Cove area, they had some trouble with those mountain men and arail road section gang also working in the same area. It seems these mendid not take to both white men and Negroes working at the mill. Therewere rumors around that they planned some sort of trouble, and Montydidn't wish any part of it. but that Christmas Eve they had a party goingon at their home and white mill workers and their families were there.The Negroes lived in a bunk house near the corn patch, and kept watch fortrouble. One lone man came to the door, and being slightly drunk, said hecould lick em all, but before he was given the chance he was picked up bya couple of the men and pitched head first out the door, but not beforehe vowed to come back with a gang. The party broke up. leaving Monty andhis family to fend for themselves against the intruders. When theyreturned the Negroes made a run for the corn patch and hid, the mill haddamage to it, tools and saws thrown into the creek, and so was the railgangs boss who tried to stop them, and he almost died of pneumonia. Thebunk house was torn up, but Monty had loyal workers and no one ran awayfor long. When Will came into town for the holidays, and found out aboutthe trouble, he notified the railroad company and they sent the managerout and he fired the whole section gang. To understand just how bad itwas to be in coming months, those same men actually asked for jobs at themill, as work was hard to find. Monty was still a young and unmarried man when he witnessed his first andonly hanging of a Negro. Apparently some of the youngsters thought it a"fun" thing to do, and when Monty was wrestled from his bed, and got hisclothes on. he was forever sorry that he went along. He liked and workedwith the Negroes in the south. In the photo album that I have that oncebelonged to Monty and Jennie, there is a photo of a young black coupledressed in their Sunday best. There is no identification, but shows thatthey must have been counted among their friends to be included in thealbum. Homer tho too young to have known Will, felt he was a very ambitious manwith an iron will and often a powerful urge to make money. This unclethat was so influential on his Pa had different ideas about work,compared to his brothers Dave and Monty. Monty was a hard worker on adaily bases, never trying to take advantage of people and Dave likedbeing a boss that had a lot of power over his workers and didn't have toget out of the horse and buggy to prove it. Harry. one of Monty's sonsand Dave's son Winfield, "Win" were good mates, close to the same age, Atone time there was a large quarrel between Dave and Monty. it stretchedon until the whole family was in on it. and the two families ended up notspeaking to one another for almost a year. Harry got a whim to go see Winand took off, walking the thirty miles. He was greeted by the wholefamily as if nothing had ever happened, this broke the ice and all waswell again until 1902 when Dave decided to move his family to Alberta,Canada. Monty was working on a farm in the Tullahoma area, that was owned by aChicago banker, whose name was Fritz Wrought. Some thought he was amillionaire, after all, he was married to the daughter of the 'local'millionaire. This farm was more or less a hobby rather then a profitmaking business. Whatever Monty needed, feed for animals, farm equipment,Fritz always saw to it. Jennie had an easier time while being there atthe farm. Besides having children to raise, whenever they were workingfor Will at the lumber mills, it was Jennie who ended up doing all thecooking for the loggers and her family. Fritz Albert was born on theWrought farm, and thus his being named for the owner. Fritz Wroughtbrought a pure bred sow to the farm and gave it to his name sake, sayingthat any offspring born were his too. It was about this time when Willhad another of his logging deals, and Monty followed along with the wholefamily. Fritz Albert never got his pigs. Never seemed to fail accordingto Jennie that whenever Monty was doing well on his own, Will came along.Will had married a widow, and she was from a well to do family, theytraveled in the small town society of Manchester. Will had a businesspartner, that took care of the money side of his affairs, a trustedaccountant. Monty and his family lived long enough in Aetna for Arthur to be born,moved onto a farm belonging to Will near Plurphsburg, but that didn'tlast long either. In 1902 Monty took his family back to Michigan. asthere was a farm belonging to an old friend who thought a lot of Montyand could no longer do the farming on his own so offered it to Monty.They were there less than a full year when they received a letter fromWill. It was 1903 and Will had been told that he was broke and that $30,000 hadbeen swindled from him by his accountant. The banker informed him of adeal in Louisiana in which he could make enough money to pay off hisdebts and more. In the letter that Monty received, Will stated he wouldshare half of the business with Monty, and son Will was 17 at the time,he read it, and others too. So again Monty was off to Louisiana. Thetimber land was located about 70 miles south of Shreveport. 3 miles outof Zwolle at a whistle stop, called Clyde. Clyde was basically a smallplantation, that a two-gun-packing southern gentleman by the name ofGeorge Pearce had cleared out of the forest and red clay hills ofLouisiana. He had several sons, and Sam later married Jennie Alwood,Monty's daughter. The Kansas City Southern Railroad went right throughthe middle of the plantation and Will built a mill and Monty took care ofthe logging end of it. Monty's son Will worked at the mill for a $1 aday, firing the boiler. Monty's wages were $2 a day, and Jennie managedto cook for everyone. The lumber was shipped by rail. The mill ran forthree years, during which time Monty had purchased another small farm.Will paid off his debts, and left for Georgia with $40,000 in his pocket.Monty's share of the business was the logging equipment, mules andhorses. Will had Monty sign off for this equipment saying he would nothave to pay for it. Will's son Ed, went on to college and took over thebusiness for his father in Georgia. where it was rumored he had become amillionaire. It was the summer of 1908 when Monty finally decided to takehis family to Canada and join his brother Dave. He sold his farm, and dueto the changes made in mill work and logging, a large logging company inthe area, let loose 500 mules and horses so there was no value on them,when a man could get them free, so Monty threw in his mules and horseswith the farm sale. He had barely enough money for tickets for the wholefamily. In fact, the train was in the station and everyone was ready toboard, when the local sheriff showed up to arrest Monty for sellingproperty he had never paid for. Seems cousin Ed had wired the banker topress charges. Monty saw his family off, he wired Will in Georgia and thecharges were dropped, and he took the next train by himself. This causeda split between the families that lasted many years. Monty and Jennie moved to Washington State and lived in the Old EqualityColony area, after many years in Alberta and British Columbia, Canada.Monty died May 23, 1936, Jennie died in Aberdeen October 18, 1940. Bothare buried in the Bow Cemetery, Bow, Washington.

Shared note

From The Family Alwood by Terry Klaus, June 1991:

ALWOODS CELEBRATE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF WEDDING Celebrating the anniversary of their wedding which took place half acentury ago, on November 1. 1885, in Tennessee, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Alwoodat their home in Old Equality Colony between Blanchard and Bow, observedtheir golden wedding day with a charming dinner party attended by anumber of relatives. Friends of the couple dropped in during the day tovisit with them and congratulate them. The Alwoods lived in Louisiana fora number of years, later homesteading in Alberta. They then moved toVancouver. B.C. and finally to their present location where they havelived for a number of years. They had eight children, two daughters, Mrs.Jenny Pierce of Shreveport. LA, and Ruth, who died at age 12 years inAlberta; six sons, Homer Grant and Harry C. of Sedro Woolley; David W. ofAberdeen, Wash; Archie R. of Winfield, Alberta; Fritz A. of Dolcey,Alberta; and Arthur L. of Bow. Washington. They have 24 grand-childrenliving and one great grandchild.

Media objectJohn C. Freemont AlwoodJohn C. Freemont Alwood
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Media objectJohn C.'s kids 1953John C.'s kids 1953
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Note: Back of photo says: "Archie, Fritz, Harry, Will, Homer, Jennie 1953 or 1948?"
Media objectStory about the Alberta farm by Homer Alwood
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